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NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC - THINKING LIKE A DOLPHIN

Dolphin Intelligence - FREE Feature Download

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It's Time for a Conversation

Breaking the communication barrier between dolphins and humans.

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Head trainer Teri Turner Bolton looks out at two young adult male dolphins, Hector and Han, whose beaks, or rostra, are poking above the water as they eagerly await a command. The bottlenose dolphins at the Roatán Institute for Marine Sciences (RIMS), a resort and research institution on an island off the coast of Honduras, are old pros at dolphin performance art. They’ve been trained to corkscrew through the air on command, skate backward across the surface of the water while standing upright on their tails, and wave their pectoral fins at the tourists who arrive several times a week on cruise ships.

But the scientists at RIMS are more interested in how the dolphins think than in what they can do. When given the hand signal to “innovate,” Hector and Han know to dip below the surface and blow a bubble, or vault out of the water, or dive down to the ocean floor, or perform any of the dozen or so other maneuvers in their repertoire—but not to repeat anything they’ve already done during that session. Incredibly, they usually understand that they’re supposed to keep trying some new behavior each session.

Bolton presses her palms together over her head, the signal to innovate, and then puts her fists together, the sign for “tandem.” With those two gestures, she has instructed the dolphins to show her a behavior she hasn’t seen during this session and to do it in unison.

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Joshua Foer wrote Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything. Brian Skerry, a contributing photographer since 1998, was named a National Geographic photography fellow in 2014.

Fieldwork was partially funded by Hussain Aga Khan and his organization, Focused on Nature.


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